Our two-year review of the Artemis Spectrum gaming headset

Kenneth Williams • August 12, 2022 9:38 pm

Our review of the Logitech Artemis Spectrum is based on two years of daily use, proving out just how solid and reliable this gaming headset really is.

Tactical shooter fans looking for a premium headset have a ton of options to pick from. Amid the sea of HyperX and Razer offerings, Logitech helps its headsets stick out with bonus buttons, expansive RGB, and a stable USB connection. The G933 Artemis Spectrum is the latest example of the company’s high-tech headphones, but is it the best choice for every gamer? Here are all the pros and cons of the Artemis Spectrum headset compared to its competitors.

If you’re looking for a quick review of the Logitech Artemis Spectrum gaming headset:

When it comes to sound, looks, and quality, the Artemis Spectrum solidly delivers on all fronts. The surround sound is perfect for clutch situations in-game with excellent input customization. The battery life isn’t the best in its class and the weight may be a turn off for some, but the Artemis Spectrum checks every box for a tactical shooter fan looking to upgrade.

What’s the target audience for the Logitech Artemis Spectrum?

Based on Logitech’s own statements, the Artemis Spectrum is geared towards the committed gamer who requires excellent surround sound. Logitech has not stated if the headset was made with any input from esports professionals, but it’s features are robust enough to be considered esports-ready, and its certainly everything you need for competitive gaming at home.

Based on the price and features, the Artemis definitely falls in the premium end of the gaming headset market. Multiple desired features like wireless connection and a noise-canceling microphone justify the $160 price tag. Similar alternatives to the G933 are the EPOS Audio H3 Hybrid and Audio-Technica ATH-G1.

As for platforms, the Artemis Spectrum lists all of the following as compatible with the headset.

  • Mac
  • PC
  • PlayStation 4
  • PlayStation 5
  • Smart TV
  • Xbox One
  • Xbox Series

The box for the Artemis Spectrum includes a direct USB and RCA cable for any platforms that cannot use the standard wireless dongle.

Logitech Artemis Spectrum promises big specs and features

The Artemis Spectrum’s feature list includes almost every popular feature, but Logitech is clearly more committed to some specs and features on this headset than others.

Starting with visuals, the Artemis Spectrum is a big headset with two rectangular cups and a wide band. It has two RGB zones along both earcups and a logo light on the left side. The 372-gram weight makes the Artemis Spectrum one of the heavier headsets in its class, though the wireless connection necessitates some extra bulk.

The noise-canceling microphone folds up to mute and store, which makes the headset easy to port around. The back of the left earcup features a volume wheel and a power slider to turn it on and off. It also houses four customizable buttons that are defaulted to standard functions like mute and deafen.

All of the buttons are completely customizable using the Logitech G Hub software. All four buttons along the left headphone can be bound to different features and inputs. In theory, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive players could use them for grenade binds. However, they are most useful as extra mute and deafen functions.

Logitech advertises the Artemis Spectrum as having 12 hours of battery life without RGB, but our review testing found it to be a bit lower than that. Turning the RGB off entirely is supposed to net eight hours, but it may fall short. The headphones do have a much longer battery life right out off the box than they will after a year or two of use.

The best parts of the Logitech Artemis Spectrum

$160 is a big chunk of change for a Valorant gaming headset, but the Logitech Artemis Spectrum delivers on many key features that show out as its best parts.

The first thing buyers will notice about the headset is its solid construction. The outer shell is perfectly aligned and rigid to the touch. This extends to the headband, which is sturdy and lined with foam for a comfortable fit. The programmable buttons feel very clicky, and the power switch requires a satisfying push to turn on and off. In our testing, the Artemis Spectrum can definitely tank a desk-height fall or two, showing its reliability even under durress.

The clicky G buttons, as Logitech labels them, are another standout feature. Few gaming headsets offer customizable input options, with some not even featuring volume control. The G Pro buttons can be easily programmed to mute, deafen, return to volume presets, and even pause and play media. The G Hub software didn’t always perform in our other reviews for different hardware, but the Artemis Spectrum worked flawlessly.

Sound is something that every gaming headset has to nail, and the Artemis Spectrum generally delivers here. The headset features 7.1 Dolby and DTS surround sound, though users can switch to mono or stereo if they like. Volume range is excellent, though music can sound strange without the appropriate settings. Lows are low, highs are high, and it’s easy to pick out the direction of footsteps in your favorite tactical shooter.

While the above-average weight may bother some gamers, Logitech prepared for the problem with its thick foam ear cups. Along with the plush headband, the Artemis Spectrum is a surprisingly comfortable pair of headphones. They’re easy to wear for long gaming sessions and hold on tight enough for most virtual reality adventures.

Artemis Spectrum battery and weight review

$160 can’t buy perfection, and this section of the reviews covers the few flaws of the Logitech Artemis Spectrum.

The battery life of the Logitech Artemis Spectrum is probably its most questionable feature. The box claims 12 hours, but after a few months of use, it begins to feel more like eight.

Voice quality can be a make-or-break quality for gaming headsets. You’ll never hear it yourself, but the Artemis Spectrum doesn’t quite deliver the same clarity and depth as other microphones in the market. It sounds very similar to the G635.

Lastly, the weight of the Logitech Artemis Spectrum could turn away some prospective buyers. The headset weighs in at 372 grams, which is enough to make them noticeable when you first wear them, though it’s easy to get used to.

How the Logitech Artemis Spectrum stacks up to alternatives

Let’s review the specs of the Logitech Artemis Spectrum compared to two of its competitors.

Logitech Artemis SpectrumEPOS Audio H3 HybridAudio-Technica ATH-G1
$160$161$169
Dongle wirelessBluetooth wirelessWired
372 gram weight298 gram weight249 gram weight
Logo and perimeter RBGNo lightingNo lighting
12 hour battery life37 hour battery lifeWired only
Volume and five custom buttonsVolume and media controlsCable mute

When put against reviews of the competition, the Logitech Artemis Spectrum wins out in RGB lighting options and customizable buttons. It’s also the only option to feature a USB dongle connection, which is much easier to set up and appears to be much less prone to interference.

However, the Artemis Spectrum falls a bit short in battery life and weight. Those giant plush ear cups and sturdy construction make it a little heavier than some of its peers, and the battery life is worse than the H3.

Logitech Artemis Spectrum balances quality with features

With everything considered, the Artemis Spectrum is a great gaming headset with a few minor flaws. The build quality is high with excellent digital customizability. The excellent Bluetooth connection and solid build quality are great benefits. Here’s a quick refresher on the best parts of the Logitech Artemis headset.

  • Solid-feeling build quality
  • Great surround sound
  • Great customization software
  • Very  comfortable earcups

The Logitech Artemis Spectrum is a great gaming headset for a Valorant player looking for a good balance of features and quality. There’s enough customizable buttons that you could bind agent abilities to them, and the surround sound is great for finding hidden enemies. Logitech’s trademark build quality and fun RGB make the price tag feel appropriate.

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