Eat Like a Pro cooking show features LEC players and coaches

Olivia R. August 22, 2019

The LEC has premiered a cooking show series on YouTube. The aim of the program, which already has four episodes, is to watch League of Legends pros prepare typical dishes from their home countries to help fans get to know them a bit better. 

The series is hosted by Trevor "Quickshot" Henry, an LoL commentator, and Romain Bigeard, OpTic Gaming's former general manager. Bigeard is now part of the LEC business development team. Both individuals have big personalities, and those personalities are put to use as hosts for "Eat Like a Pro." 

The first episode features Rogue top laner Kim "Profit" Jun-hyung teaching Quickshot how to make a traditional Korean dish, japchae. While chopping vegetables, Profit tells Quickshot how he became involved in the pro League scene. At 19, he had the choice to be on a Korean soft roster, or on the main roster of a Chinese team. 

"I played with veteran players, and learned a lot," Profit said. 

He also opened up about his family disliking his choice to play professional League of Legends instead of going to a university. Now that he makes a steady salary, they have accepted that it's a real professional for him. 

When it comes to dealing with nerves on stage, Profit told Quickshot that Rogue has a breathing coach. 

Bigeard hosts their next episode, which features Splyce's Andrei "Xerxe" Dragomir. The jungler from Romania teaches Bigeard how to cook polenta, although he admits to never having cooked it himself before. 

"I checked many Romanian dishes and this was the easiest one to make," he said. "My mom used to make it, and I'm hoping to make it as tasty as she used to make it." 

While Xerxe said he missed home, he is still very happy with his teammates in the Splyce gaming house. While boiling water, Xerxe said he still talks to his friends and family back home. He even said his dad gives him advice after watching his games. 

"My mom watches the games, but she doesn't have as much knowledge as my dad. Just by watching, my dad can tell which teams are aggressive, like G2. He will say we aren't moving as a team, but they're moving as a unit." 

When Bigeard asked Xerxe how he felt that his dad was praising G2, Xerxe laughed and said, "He's not wrong." 

There's also an episode with Paul "sOAZ" boyer, a French top laner who currently plays for Misfits Gaming. He teaches Quickshot how to make cannolis, a speciality from his hometown, as Quickshot's dog tries to get in on the pastry action. 

"I was in a cooking school for a little bit more than six months," sOAZ said. 

But he dropped out of culinary school to become a pro gamer. While he was at the cooking school, it was around the time of Season 1's World Championship. sOAZ had to make a choice to become a full-time player. 

"My favorite food is Japanese," sOAZ said, when Quickshot asked what food he likes the best now that he's traveled the world. 

Quickshot seemed to be trying to get sOAZ to expand on some of his answers. But with a background in cooking, the top laner was quite fixated on creating the perfect cannoli. 

The last episode features Vitality's coach Jacob "YamatoCannon" Mebdi. He instructs Bigeard on how to cook the perfect mushroom risotto, a dish that is close to his heart. It's also the only thing he knows how to cook. 

"Good leaders delegate," YamatoCannon said, when Bigeard pointed out that he was quick to give orders in the kitchen. 

He also said that he puts the same expectations on himself as he does his roster. If he gives them a curfew, he will also sleep at the same hour. 

"I come from a position where I actually do what I say," YamatoCannon said. 

From there, the coach started to delve into a lot of mushroom facts. He admitted that he even stays up way too late sometimes reading about mushrooms from experts on the internet. 

"Eat Like a Pro" has been met with positivity from the League of Legends community thus far. Many comments expressed that they felt they understood the players and coaches more after getting to see them interact in the kitchen.